Gaelic is thriving—Gun Dochas

Bit ironic for a title given the name of the song, Gun Dochas, literally means without hope. And yet, there are so many ways you can connect with this song that it's mind blowing. You can have no Gaelic at all or spend hours appreciating all the twists in a single line. This song will … Continue reading Gaelic is thriving—Gun Dochas

The best Gaelic song in the world—An Eala Bhan

Gur duilich leam mar tha mi 's mo chridhe 'n sas aig bron Sorrow is with me because my heart and I are full of sadness Sounds a bit melodramatic until you realise the guy who wrote it was living through the trenches of World War One at the time. An Eala Bhan is perhaps … Continue reading The best Gaelic song in the world—An Eala Bhan

Poetry alert—why we should all be reading Catullus

μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος Sing of the rage, goddess, of Achilles, Pelleus' son. The first words of Western literature. The first words are a calling to the Muse to inspire the tragic story about to be unfolded. As I said last week, it's the Muse who ultimately drives our creative efforts. None understand this better than poets and … Continue reading Poetry alert—why we should all be reading Catullus

How I deal with Writer’s Block

Firstly, yes it is a thing, though something rather nebulous. There's no one answer to fight it either—nothing works all the time. I've found it's like taking antibiotics, the stronger the stuff you use to fight it, the more it will mutate and find new ways to get you. Still, I personally think there's a … Continue reading How I deal with Writer’s Block

On Sons of Anarchy

Forget House of Cards. Forget Game of Thrones. There's one show out in recent years which eclipses them all in terms of brutality and intrigue. Sons of Anarchy. A show about American bikers sounds like the last thing an up and coming novelist should be talking about. It might be brutal, but shouldn't you be … Continue reading On Sons of Anarchy

On Wuthering Heights

“I have not broken your heart―you have broken it; and in breaking it, you have broken mine.” Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights. Give me a dark, tragic romance that's bitter-sweet. Give me all the cliches. I don't care. Sometimes stories end on a nice note. Sometimes stories have good people rewarded and bad people punished and all … Continue reading On Wuthering Heights

Why Aussies have the best Children’s Fiction

The mid-90's and early 2000's was a great time to be a child in Australia. Not that I'm biased or anything but our Children's Fiction was the envy of the world. Years later I had friends in Britain telling me how Britain imported our TV shows at the time and that they, half the world … Continue reading Why Aussies have the best Children’s Fiction